Perfect Picture Book Friday – Big Friends

Hooray!

It’s Perfect Picture Book Friday!

And what could be better under these stuck-inside circumstances than a new list of fantastic books with hopefully very time-consuming  😊 fun, entertaining activities to go along with them? (that will hopefully keep the little darlings busy for a loooooong time!) (oh, I’m sorry, did I say that out loud?! 😊)

You know how Christmas and birthdays with babies, toddlers, and young children often make you feel that you could have foregone the gifts…because all they want to do is play with the box?

I figured, what with all of us holed up in our homes (possibly feeling like we’re IN a box! 😊) this would be a good day to have a story about friendship and boxes and activities that are all kinds of things you can do with a cardboard box!

Big Friends

Title: Big Friends

Written By: Linda Sarah

Illustrated By: Benji Davies

Henry Holt & Co, January 2016, Fiction

Suitable For Ages: 4-8

Themes/Topics: friendship, loneliness, imagination, play

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Opening: “Two cardboard boxes, big enough to sit in, hide inside.  Birt and Etho take them out each day, climb Sudden Hill, and sit in them.

Sometimes they’re kings, soldiers, astronauts.  Sometimes they’re pirates sailing wild seas and skies.

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Brief Synopsis: (From the jacket copy) “Birt and Etho are best friends. Together they play outside in big cardboard boxes. Sometimes they’re kings, soldiers, astronauts. Sometimes they’re pirates sailing wild seas and skies. But always, always they’re Big friends. Then one day a new boy arrives, and he wants to join them. Can two become three?”

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Links To Resources: 31 Things To Do With  A Cardboard Box (yes it’s a Buzzfeed link, but there are photos and how-to tutorials for all 31 and they’re so much fun!!!); 101 Things To Do With A Cardboard Box (never mind 31! :)); Make Your Own Friendship Bracelets (video tutorial)

Why I Like This Book: This is a lovely book, filled with the friendship and imaginative play of two boys who get along and understand each other… until a third boy shows up and threatens the balance not because he’s difficult or unpleasant – quite the opposite – but because he’s new and changes the dynamic.  It’s a story about struggling to incorporate someone new without losing the old.  It is not sentimental or sappy in any way, but I promise you will say “Aw!” on the last page 🙂  It’s an important story because integrating new friendships is a skill and a struggle that every child faces at some point.  The pull toward someone new and fun that calls to one member of a friendship, the jealously that threatens the other… or sometimes just the fear that things will change, a true friend will be lost, the friendship will not be the same.  Don’t miss this one!

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I hope you enjoy it as much as I do 🙂

For the complete list of books with resources, please visit Perfect Picture Books.

PPBF folks, please add your titles and post-specific links (and any other info you feel like filling out 🙂 ) to the form below so we can all come see what fabulous picture books you’ve chosen to share this week!

Have a wonderful weekend, everyone and stay well!!! 😊🌷🌸😊

 

Would You Read It Wednesday #355 – Capybara Triplets (PB) PLUS The November/December and January/Early February Pitch Picks!!!

Hey there, everyone!

Just when you thought we’d never get around to the November/December and January/Early February Pitch Picks. . . guess what we’re doing today? 😊

Let’s jump right in, shall we?

Here are the pitches from November/December, some revised, some the same as the original:

#1 – Lynne – Samantha’s Swimsuit (PB 3-7)

Samantha is a girl who knows what she wants when it comes to fashion. When she was imagining the absolutely dreamy suit for summer swim lessons, Samantha forgot about one.  Little.  Detail.  It would get wet. What if water ruins her perfect swimsuit?!?  Now Samantha must decide if she is relegated to the lounge chairs (safely outside of the splash zone!) or if she takes a chance in the pool!

#2 – Lu – Mary Janes (PB 4-8)

All 6 yr. old Bella wants is a pair of new shoes, not just any shoes, but red Mary Janes. On her Saturday shopping outing with her grandmother, she notices the shoes of others. There are jump-roping girls wearing Keds, ice cream eating girls in black and white saddle shoes, and well-heeled ladies at her uncle’s butcher shop. Bella’s dream comes true in an unexpected way.

#3 – Megan – Wired To Worry (PB 4-8)

Bot arrives on the doorstep in a smiling box, ready to lead a perfectly programmed life.  Except he’s not perfect.  Bot has an extra worry port and everything from dripping water to malfunctioning lasers threatens to overload his system.  But when disaster strikes, Bot just might find that being wired to worry isn’t a fatal error after all.

#4 – Sarah – Lilly’s Get A Great Night’s Sleep Book: Trust Me! It Works! (PB 4-8)

Lilly had a hard time sleeping. Maybe it was all the TV, the lack of bedtime snacks, or her wild imagination, but she finally figured out the (sort-of) perfect pre-sleep routine. Now she wants YOU to get a great night sleep too! In her made-for-TV style, Lilly shares her seven step method including bedtime buddies and a just right way to say good night.

 

Please choose the one you like best and vote for it in the poll below by Sunday April 5 at 9PM Eastern.

 

And now here are the beautifully updated and revised pitches from January/Early February:

#1 – Sarah – Waddles And Wheels (PB 4-8)

Wheels is waiting when Waddles flies in to spend summer at the pond. Waddles befriends Wheels and is undaunted by the toy duck’s limitations. Waddles quacks and takes the lead while Wheels clickety tickety follows along. When it’s time for Waddles to migrate, he tries to take Wheels with him but is forced to make a difficult decision. As spring returns, so too does Waddles and his new friend Lucille.

#2 – Paul – All Over The World (PB 4-6) (formerly Does It Rain?)

In a whirlwind tour of the world, from the Outback to Peru to Israel and Cameroon, ALL OVER THE WORLD (249 words, ages 6-8) reminds us that rain falls. The sun shines. Plants grow. Birds fly. Children read and laugh and play and write. Parents kiss their children and tuck them into bed at night. And all of us, regardless of age or gender, irrespective of orientation or creed, no matter our continent or city or home, share the same struggles and triumphs, fears and dreams, joys and laughter and hopes. All over the world.

#3 – Sarah – Bigness (PB 5-8)  (formerly The Dark Bigness)

Theo wants to watch the colors swirl like music sounds across his eyelids, but he knows what’s coming. When the shifty shadows of sleepiness unleash the Bigness, Theo faces the scariest part of his pre-dream world: Monster. Theo summons all his courage to conquer the endless darkness of his imagination and fall peacefully asleep.

#4 – Rena – Iggy Crane: The Case of the Missing Bolt (CB 7-9)

A mystery is brewing in Monster Hollow. Kid detective Iggy Crane takes the case in hopes of following in her great uncle’s sleuthing footsteps. But as the day unfolds, Franko’s stolen bolt isn’t the only problem Iggy is tasked with. She must find a missing bat, stop a fight and calm a fearsome Egyptian princess. She better get detecting as the bolt is the key to winning this year’s science fair, starting in a few short hours. Nancy Drew and the Clue Crew meets The Legend of Sleepy Hollow with a dollop of science and a dose of spooky.

#5 – Augusta – Spotlight (PB 4-8)

Hank feels out of place in his theatrical family. Everyone has a talent
to showcase on stage, but him; his dad is an acrobat, his mom a ballerina, and his sister a magician. Hank longs to to shine in the spotlight too. Will Hank be able to save the day and get his chance to discover his talent under the spotlight when an unfortunate accident renders his family unable to perform on opening night?

 

Please choose the one you like best and vote for it in the poll below by Sunday April 5 at 9 PM Eastern.

 

Phew!  All that reading and choosing and voting calls for Something Chocolate, don’t you think?  Let’s go fancy and delicious with Chocolate Bird’s Nest Cake 😊

Chocolate Bird’s Nest Cake

Isn’t that so pretty?  Also chocolate-y and scrumptious-looking?!  Nothing says breakfast like chocolate cake 😊

Now then, onto today’s pitch which comes to us from Sandy who says, “I am a retired teacher that spends her days walking the dog and writing the stories I’ve carried in my head for years.  Please find more about me at jesusjingle.com or on FB @makingmuchofHisname.  ”

Find her on the web at

Here is her pitch:

Working Title: Capybara Triplets

Age/Genre: Picture Book (ages 4-8)

The Pitch: The capybara triplets, Sebastian, Arturo, and Esteban, have had fun all day playing soccer, wallowing in the mud, and swimming.  When it’s time to wind down the day and prepare for bed the brothers go into bedtime avoidance behavior with silly antics but little success. What will they find when they run recon to gather intelligence on the nighttime activities they are missing?

So what do you think?  Would You Read It?  YES, MAYBE or NO?

If your answer is YES, please feel free to tell us what you particularly liked and why the pitch piqued your interest.  If your answer is MAYBE or NO, please feel free to tell us what you think could be better in the spirit of helping Sandy improve her pitch.  Helpful examples of possible alternate wordings are welcome.  (However I must ask that comments be constructive and respectful.  I reserve the right not to publish comments that are mean because that is not what this is about.)

Please send YOUR pitches for the coming weeks!  For rules and where to submit, click on this link Would You Read It or on Would You Read it in the dropdown under For Writers in the bar above.  There are openings in April, so you could get your pitch up pretty soon for helpful feedback and a chance to have it read and commented on by editor Erin Molta!

Sandy is looking forward to your thoughts on her pitch!  I am looking forward to seeing who wins these Pitch Picks and to (hopefully!) posting the Late February/March one next week so we’re all caught up!

Have a wonderful Wednesday everyone, and stay healthy and well!!! 😊

 

Tuesday Debut – Presenting Susi Schaefer!

Hello, Everyone!

I truly hope this morning’s post finds you and your loved ones all healthy and well!

We are certainly in unusual times.  A lot of sad and scary things are happening in the world.  But at the same time, trouble seems to bring out the good in people and there are shining examples of love and kindness, people helping other people, all over the world.  In New York City at 7 PM each evening, a cheer goes up to thank all the health care professionals who are working so tirelessly and selflessly to help everyone – a moment of gratitude and solidarity that is profoundly uplifting.  (Turn your sound up so you can really hear the clapping and cheering, the clanging and cowbells and whooping!)

And that is just one example of so many around the world.

Here in the world of children’s literature, we have our own little moments.  For many debut authors whose are books are coming out between today and the end of June, the excitement of launching their very first picture books has been dampened by current events.  Bookstores and libraries are closed, so launch events have been cancelled.  Book festivals of all kinds have been postponed.  There can be no in-person publicity or promotion.  It doesn’t feel like much of a celebration of something they have worked so hard for.

So let’s pull together and do everything we can to help today’s debut author and all the others who will be introduced to you in the coming weeks celebrate and find joy in their launches.  Let’s help them spread the word.  Let’s cheer them on online through social media and to our friends and relatives over the phone.  Let’s help them enjoy this most wonderful moment in their lives and get their books the attention they deserve!

Without further ado, I am thrilled to present to you today’s debut author, Susi Schaefer, a talented writer and illustrator, a graduate of Making Picture Book Magic, and a fellow member of our kid lit community who needs our help to show off her book, which releases next Tuesday on April 7!

CAT LADIES
Written & Illustrated by Susi Schaefer (Author/Illustrator)
Published By Abrams Books For Young Readers
April 7th 2020
Fiction Picture Book

Cat Ladies

This witty picture book explores the loving bond between a cat and her humans.

SUSANNA:  Welcome, Susi!  Thank you so much for joining us today to share your journey to publication so we can all learn!  Where did the idea for this book come from?

SUSI: Thank you for having me on your blog, Susanna! Here is a little background story on how CAT LADIES came to be.

My dad’s cousin, Maridl, lives in the Austrian Alps (where I was born and raised). Maridl has a semi-feral cat that chose her garden as her ”home”, and Maridl took on the task of feeding her. She named the cat Poppele, and the two have a loving bond. But when Maridl, who is in her 90s, experienced some health challenges, she had to move into a care home. Now my parents have taken over the cat’s care, and they still bring Maridl to the house often to visit with her beloved Poppele!

I was trying to imagine what it would be like if Poppele would have been able to go with Maridl to the care home. What would her life be like? What would matter to her, and what wouldn’t? How could I turn this into a story?

 

SUSANNA: How long did it take you to write this book?

SUSI: I started the manuscript in late 2017, and publication is on April 7th, 2020. While I always knew the POV, I wasn’t sure if first person or third person would be stronger. Also, since I’m the illustrator as well, I put together a dummy with several finished illustrations. So, that took some extra time.

 

SUSANNA: Did you go through many revisions?

SUSI: I went through a fair amount of revisions, but I don’t mind the process. I wrote the first draft in literally a day and also created a couple of initial illustrations. It was so much fun; I still smile thinking about that day. When I showed the idea to my family, critique partners, and illustrator friends, I knew that I had something worth pursuing further. Once I got the story to a point that felt substantial, I sent the project to my agent. He shared my enthusiasm and, with his editorial prowess, he made the story a lot stronger. And, after CAT LADIES was acquired, it was made even better by the fantastic notes of my editor, art director, and book designer.

 

SUSANNA: When and how did you submit?

SUSI: As I mentioned, I work with an agent and he sent the dummy to a list of houses that felt like a good fit.

 

SUSANNA: When did you get “the call”?  (Best moment ever! 😊)

SUSI: The book was picked up quickly, and I was thrilled that more than one publisher was interested in CAT LADIES. It ended up selling at auction.

 

SUSANNA: How did you celebrate signing your contract?

SUSI: I volunteer for a cat rescue, so I gave all the cats extra treats that week.

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SUSANNA: Oh!  I love that!  What a special way to celebrate!  Can you tell us a little about the editorial process?

SUSI: My editor didn’t have any big changes, just some logistical input. I was happy to implement everything because it made the story more streamlined. Plus, I am a firm believer that the book creating process is a team effort.

 

SUSANNA: Please tell us about illustrating – something that is a bit of a mystery to many of us!

SUSI: As the illustrator, I got to work closely with the art director.  The notes I received were pretty minor, so the whole process went smoothly. I didn’t use art notes for CAT LADIES, but overall I find them useful and include them whenever I show a new manuscript to my agent. The trick is to keep them short and sweet, like (Art Note: Chases balloon).

Cat Ladies interior

 

SUSANNA: Did you get to see advance reviews from Kirkus, SLJ, etc? What was that like?

SUSI: Yes! It was exciting and, naturally, a little nerve-wracking. But reviews are a great tool to help promote a book, so it’s par for the course.

 

SUSANNA: How long did it take from offer to having the first copy in your hand?

SUSI: It took about two years to receive my advance author copy.

 

SUSANNA: What kind of marketing and promotion has your publisher done for this book?

SUSI: My publisher has been promoting my book on social media, has sent it out for reviews, and brought it to literary conventions, amongst other things. However, several events had to be canceled due to the COVID-19 crisis.

 

SUSANNA: Describe any marketing/promotion you did for this book.

SUSI: I created a book trailer, some coloring sheets and scheduled blog interviews (including this fabulous one). In addition, I hosted a giveaway on Twitter and Instagram. I also have a YouTube channel where I post free drawing tutorials for artists of all ages, including a tutorial for Princess, the cat from my book.

Sadly, my in-person events had to be put on hold for now, to keep everyone safe.

SUSANNA: We will certainly all do what we can to help you out, Susi!  How long was it between the time you started writing seriously and the time you sold your first picture book?

SUSI: I started writing seriously in 2014, and I sold CAT LADIES in 2018.

 

SUSANNA: Anything else you’d like to share about your book’s journey from inspiration to publication?

SUSI: I had a lot of help, motivation, and inspiration along the way by joining the SCBWI, participating in Storystorm, Twitter chats, and Instagram prompts. Also, online courses like Making Picture Book Magic and SVS Learn helped me grow, both as an author and illustrator.

CAT LADIES is a story I would have told whether it ended up published or not. It brought me so much joy to tell, even if only my family and friends would have seen it. I find it rewarding to write for the love of storytelling. Luckily, my agent and publisher felt the same way I did about this book 😊

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Maridl – upon whom this wonderful story was based

 

SUSANNA:  Thank you so much for taking the time to participate in this series, Susi, and paying it forward to other writers!  We wish you all the best of luck with this and future books!

Abrams Author photo 2

Author/Illustrator Susi Schaefer

Here is my website:
Here are my Twitter and IG handles:
susischaeferart
Here is the cat drawing tutorial:
Here is the animal rescue group link:

 

Readers, if you have questions for Susi, please post them in the comments below and if she has time I’m sure she’ll respond!

You may purchase Susi’s book and have it in your hot little hands on publication day at:
(all links below are book-specific)

Abrams
Indiebound
Amazon
Barnes&Noble

We can help our debut authors successfully launch their careers by:

– purchasing their books

– recommending their books to friends and family

– recommending their books to our children’s teachers and librarians

– recommending their books to our local libraries and bookstores

– suggesting them as visiting authors at our children’s schools and our local libraries

– sharing their books on social media

– reviewing their books on Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes&Noble, and other sites where people go to learn about books.

Thank you all for stopping by to read today!  Have a lovely, inspiration-filled Tuesday!  Maybe today is the day you’ll write your debut picture book 🙂

Missed any previous Tuesday Debuts?  Check them out!

Christy Mihaly – Hey! Hey! Hay! A Tale of Bales And The Machines That Make Them

Jessie Oliveros – The Remember Balloons

Beth Anderson – An Inconvenient Alphabet: Ben Franklin And Noah Webster’s Spelling Revolution

Hannah Holt – The Diamond And The Boy

Laura Renauld – Porcupine’s Pie

Annie Romano – Before You Sleep: A Bedtime Book Of Gratitude

Melissa Stoller – Scarlet’s Magic Paintbrush

Sherry Howard – Rock And Roll Woods

Kate Narita – 100 Bugs! A Counting Book

Vivian Kirkfield – Pippa’s Passover Plate

Laura Roettiger – Aliana Reaches For The Moon

Matthew Lasley – Pedro’s Pan: A Gold Rush Story

Natalee Creech – When Day Is Done

Margaret Chiu Greanias – Maximillian Villainous

Wendy Greenley – Lola Shapes The Sky

Danielle Dufayet – You Are Your Strong

B.J. Lee – There Was An Old Gator Who Swallowed A Moth

Cathy Ballou Mealey – When A Tree Grows

Pippa Chorley – Counting Sheep

Sandra Sutter – The Real Farmer In The Dell

June Smalls – Odd Animals ABC

Jill Mangel Weisfeld – Riley The Retriever Wants A New Job (self pub)

Kathleen Cornell Berman – The Birth Of Cool: How Jazz Great Miles Davis Found His Sound

Eleanor Ann Peterson – Jurassic Rat

Sarah Hoppe – Who Will? Will You?

Marla LeSage – Pirate Year Round

Stacey Corrigan – The Pencil Eater

Shannon Stocker – Can U Save The Day?

Nadine Poper – Randall And Randall

Christine Evans – Evelyn The Adventurous Entomologist

Karen Kiefer – Drawing God (religious market)

Susan Richmond – Bird Count

Dawn Young – The Night Baafore Christmas

Heather Gale – Ho’onani: Hula Warrior

Ciara O’Neal – Flamingo Hugs Aren’t For Everyone (self pub)

Theresa Kiser – A Little Catholic’s Book Of Liturgical Colors (religious market)

Lindsey Hobson – Blossom’s Wish (self pub)

Kirsten Larson – Wood, Wire, Wings: Emma Lilian Todd Invents An Airplane

Valerie Bolling – Let’s Dance!

Janet Johnson – Help Wanted: Must Love Books

Perfect Picture Book Friday – And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street

Woo hoo!  It’s Perfect Picture Book Friday!

Today, we’re going to travel back in time to a book I loved back in my misspent youth in about 1969 😊

Stuck in our houses as we all are under the circumstances, what a perfect time to look out the window and see what we can see!

And maybe improve on what we actually see with a little imagination. . . 😊

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Title: And To Think That I Saw It On Mulberry Street

Written & Illustrated By: Dr. Seuss

Vanguard Press, Inc.,  1937, fiction

Suitable For Ages: 5-9

Themes/Topics: Imagination/tall tales, language fun (rhyme)

Opening: “When I leave home to walk to school,
Dad always says to me,
“Marco, keep your eyelids up
And see what you can see.”

But when I tell him where I’ve been
And what I think I’ve seen,
He looks at me and sternly says,
“Your eyesight’s much too keen.

“Stop telling such outlandish tales.
Stop turning minnows into whales.”

Now what can I say,
When I get home today?

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Brief Synopsis: Charged with keeping his eyes open and reporting back on what he sees on his way home from school, Marco simply can’t tell his father that all he saw was a plain horse and wagon on Mulberry Street!  So as he walks along, he think of how he could jazz it up a bit… 😊

Links To Resources: Look out the window of your house or car, or take a little walk, and see what you can see, then imagine it into a grander version and draw a picture of what you imagine, or write or tell a story about it!  You can also see how many things you can see that start with the letter A (or any other letter), or count how many flowers (or other objects) you can see.   Construction paper little red wagon; Bumping Up And Down In My Little Red Wagon (song)

Why I Like This Book: This is Dr. Seuss’s very first book for children, and as you can tell by the condition of the book in the photo above, it was one of my very first books – much loved by me and my siblings back in the late ’60s and early ’70s, and much loved by my children a couple decades later.  It is the classic cumulative tale, beginning with a plain horse and wagon and getting more and more embellished until he’s got a brass band with a man in a little house hitched on behind being pulled by an elephant ridden by a rajah and flanked by two giraffes… until he has a story that no one can beat – and to think that he saw it on Mulberry Street!!  I’m sure we’ve all felt the urge from time to time to make a story a little more interesting by adding a few details here and there. . . certainly kids like to do it. . . sometimes to see how far they can get and what people will believe!  But the end result in this story is that, despite the fun he had with his imagination, Marco tells the plain truth – dull as it may seem in comparison to his active imagination 😊

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I hope you enjoy it as much as I do 🙂

For the complete list of books with resources, please visit Perfect Picture Books.

PPBF folks, please add your titles and post-specific links (and any other info you feel like filling out 🙂 ) to the form below so we can all come see what fabulous picture books you’ve chosen to share this week!

Have a wonderful weekend, everyone!!! 🙂

And stay safe and well!!! 🌷

Would You Read It Wednesday #354 – Maple & Pine (PB)

Darlings, has the novelty of working from home…whilst homeschooling the littles…whilst still being in charge of laundry, household chores, cooking, refereeing, peacekeeping, and entertaining…. whilst trying to exercise in the hall closet because the rest of the house is overrun with hooligans and it’s the only place you can get any privacy… whilst not being able to take the kids to the park or the zoo or the movies or even send them to play next door…  worn off?

I’m thinking we’d better have some fun!  How about you?

This is a game adults and kids, parents and teachers, writers and illustrators, anyone and everyone can play!

Are you ready?

It’s time to make Story Starter Cootie Catchers!

In case you don’t remember how to fold them, here’s a little review:

And in case you don’t remember where to write on them, here’s a template:

A nice flat clear one:

cootie catcher

and then mine which is less flat and less clear but has the right kind of information on it! 😊

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You will need 4 colors (I chose Orange, Purple, Raspberry, and Turquoise.)  Alternatively you could choose 4 animals, or 4 musical instruments, or whatever blows your hair back 😊

Then you need 8 numbers.  I went with the obvious: 1-8.  But you can pick whatever you like 😊 You could also swap out the numbers for genres if you want – adventure, mystery, how-to, etc.

Then you need 8 story elements of some kind.  I actually put in choices to get more mileage out of my little homemade idea generator, but for those of you who are trying to get mileage out of entertaining your kids, let them make as many cootie catchers with as many options as they like…!

I put in 8 different story starter/opening lines and also 8 different sets of 3 random words.  You could choose one or the other or parts of both if you land on that option while playing the game.

You could also use the colors and/or numbers as part of your story if you wanted to.

If thinking up what to put in doesn’t work for you, you are most welcome to use my options – I’m pretty sure you can read them with a little zoom-in and tilt your head sideways!

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So, for example, if you were using MY fancy little story starter, you could choose

Raspberry, (and you open and close the cootie catcher 9 times as you spell out r-a-s-p-b-e-r-r-y which lands you on a choice of 4 possible numbers)
so you might choose  3,
and when you lift that flap it that would give you a story that started with Rory rounded the corner quickly and ran headfirst into. . .

or you could choose to write a story that included the words cinnamon, feather, and bubble

If you wanted to also incorporate raspberry and/or 3, you could do that as well!

See?

Instantly ideas begin to percolate!

If your kids are old enough to read and write, they can make their own story starter cootie catchers and you can trade them around so you get other people’s sparks.

If you’re trying to stretch out the entertainment value, your kids can write, illustrate, act out, make up a song or a jump rope rhyme, and/or tell stories as well, earning you time to do your work (or hide in the hall closet!!!)

Then, after you’ve all had tons of fun with creativity, you can make a snack together!

Something Chocolate – Fun For Kids Chocolate-Dipped Rice Krispie Treats!

Fun For Kids Chocolate-Dipped Rice Krispie Treats!

 

These are decorated with rainbow sprinkles, but you can decorate with anything you like – mini marshmallows, blueberries, peanut butter chips, slightly stale breadcrumbs if that’s all that’s left in your larder… 😊 – just another opportunity to use your imagination!

Ta da!  I hope I’ve given you a way to entertain your household for at least 14 minutes today 😊

Now then, onto today’s pitch which comes to us from Jenny Prevost, an aspiring picture book author and french fry aficionado who also loves coffee, her small southern town, and going on adventures with her hilariously loud family. (3 kids, 2 pets, 1 husband and a partridge in a pear tree. Kidding, no pear trees… only citrus ones.) She interviews authors and shares writerly musings at www.jennyprevost.com and ‘mom stuff’ over on  www.thelafayettemom.com.

Here is her pitch:

Working Title: Maple & Pine

Age/Genre: Picture Book (ages 4-8)

The Pitch: Maple gives the best high fives and her words are sweet as syrup, but she’s planted next to Pine, who pokes fun all year long. At least until a springtime storm shakes things up and gives Pine a fresh perspective.

So what do you think?  Would You Read It?  YES, MAYBE or NO?

If your answer is YES, please feel free to tell us what you particularly liked and why the pitch piqued your interest.  If your answer is MAYBE or NO, please feel free to tell us what you think could be better in the spirit of helping Jenny improve her pitch.  Helpful examples of possible alternate wordings are welcome.  (However I must ask that comments be constructive and respectful.  I reserve the right not to publish comments that are mean because that is not what this is about.)

Please send YOUR pitches for the coming weeks!  For rules and where to submit, click on this link Would You Read It or on Would You Read it in the dropdown under For Writers in the bar above.  There are openings in April, so you could get your pitch up pretty soon for helpful feedback and a chance to have it read and commented on by editor Erin Molta!

Jenny is looking forward to your thoughts on her pitch!  I am looking forward to hearing how you all fare with Story Starter Cootie Catchers!  Feel free to share your story starters in the comments!  And feel free to share this blog post with any of your desperate bored friends! 😊

Have a wonderful Wednesday everyone!!! 🙂

 

Perfect Picture Book Friday – The Storybook Knight

It’s Perfect Picture Book Friday and it’s officially SPRING!!!

Woo hoo!

I think that calls for a little kicking up our heels, don’t you? 😊

Untitled design (4)

SQUEEEEE!!!!! 😊

After all that frolicking I suppose I should be sharing a book that celebrates cavorting… I didn’t quite manage that, but I’ve got one that celebrates adventure. . . 😊 🐉

storybook knight

Title: The Storybook Knight

Written By: Helen Docherty

Illustrated By: Thomas Docherty

Sourcebooks Jabberwocky, September 2016, fiction

Suitable For Ages: 4-8

Themes/Topics: reading, being true to yourself, standing up for what you love

Opening: “Leo was a gentle knight
in thought and word and deed.
While other knights liked fighting,
Leo liked to sit and read.

He was kind to every creature.
He wouldn’t hurt a fly.

When Mom and Dad said,
“Knights must FIGHT!”
he couldn’t quite see why.”

Screen Shot 2020-03-17 at 11.54.29 PM

text copyright Helen Docherty 2016, illustration copyright Thomas Docherty 2016 Sourcebooks Jabberwocky

Brief Synopsis: Leo is a small knight who is fond of adventures—at least the ones found in his books. His parents hope that the challenge of fighting a dragon with his new shield and sword will turn him into a brave, dragon-fighting knight. But Leo finds his own way to tame the dangerous beasts he comes across on his quest! 😊

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text copyright Helen Docherty 2016, illustration copyright Thomas Docherty 2016 Sourcebooks Jabberwocky

Links To Resources: Easy Dragon Crafts for Kids; waffle dragon (recipe); dragon songs ; read with There Was An Old Dragon Who Swallowed A Knight by Penny Parker Klosterman

Why I Like This Book: fun read-aloud rhyme, active, engaging illustrations, and a fun story – what’s not to love? 😊 But one thing I especially love is how distinctly all the characters come across.  Leo is so appealing.  It’s wonderful to see his confidence in himself, and how he uses what he loves and believes in to solve the problems he comes across.  It’s a good message for all of us to use the tools we have 😊

Screen Shot 2020-03-17 at 11.55.51 PM

text copyright Helen Docherty 2016, illustration copyright Thomas Docherty 2016 Sourcebooks Jabberwocky

I hope you enjoy it as much as I do 😊

For the complete list of books with resources, please visit Perfect Picture Books.

PPBF folks, please add your titles and post-specific links (and any other info you feel like filling out 🙂 ) to the form below so we can all come see what fabulous picture books you’ve chosen to share this week!

Have a wonderful weekend, everyone!!! 🙂

And stay safe and healthy!

Would You Read It Wednesday #353 – Skritch, Scratch, Snuffle (PB)

Greetings, friends!

Somehow, in this crazy week, we’ve come around to Would You Read It Wednesday!

Today, before we get to our pitch, I have a couple You Could Read It stories for you😊

Since we’re all looking for ways to keep our kids engaged while they’re out of school, or trying to fill out our lesson plans if we’re teachers, or hearkening back to the better times of our youth if we’re just old like me😊 here are a couple of my favorite stories that might be new to today’s kids (since they’re oldies but goodies)!


And what could go better with story time than Something Chocolate?  How about some Death By Reeses Cheesecake Brownies?😊

Death By Reeses Cheesecake Brownies

 

I would say YUMMMM!!!!! but my mouth is too full 😊

Now, isn’t that lovely?  Between the stories and the recipes you’ve got a way to entertain yourself and your kids for the better part of a morning!😊

Now then, onto today’s pitch which comes to us from Shae who says, “My name is Shae Pepper. I’m a new picture book author. In addition to being The Traveling Teach (www.facebook.com/thetravelingteach), curating my dogs instagram (www.instagram.com/trufflestravelsus), I travel full-time with my husband and Truffles, and blog about it at www.nohomejustroam.com. I am a regular contributor to the online Cincy Pet Magazine (cincypet.com).  My own experiences with anxiety and my Master’s Degree in Youth Work and Community Development, particularly helping children and teens develop life skills, provides a unique perspective on this subject.

Here is her pitch:

Working Title: Skritch, Scratch, Snuffle

Age/Genre: Picture Book (ages 3-8)

The Pitch: Just like children, Waffles, an anxious wombat, has trouble keeping her fears to a manageable size. She hears a noise and imagines the “what-if” monster which grows as her imagination runs wild. She’s certain she’s going to be eaten, until her echidna friend, Chicken, appears at her door and together they overcome the monster.

So what do you think?  Would You Read It?  YES, MAYBE or NO?

If your answer is YES, please feel free to tell us what you particularly liked and why the pitch piqued your interest.  If your answer is MAYBE or NO, please feel free to tell us what you think could be better in the spirit of helping Shae improve her pitch.  Helpful examples of possible alternate wordings are welcome.  (However I must ask that comments be constructive and respectful.  I reserve the right not to publish comments that are mean because that is not what this is about.)

Please send YOUR pitches for the coming weeks!  For rules and where to submit, click on this link Would You Read It or on Would You Read it in the dropdown under For Writers in the bar above.  There are openings in April, so you could get your pitch up pretty soon for helpful feedback and a chance to have it read and commented on by editor Erin Molta!

Shae is looking forward to your thoughts on her pitch!  I am looking forward to some procrastabaking (a term you can thank my daughter for 😊)!!!

Have a wonderful Wednesday everyone!!! 😊

And I hope you all stay safe and well!

 

Perfect Picture Book Friday – Jamie O’Rourke And The Big Potato: An Irish Folktale

Hurray!  It’s Perfect Picture Book Friday!

With St. Patrick’s Day right around the corner, I wanted to share an Irish folktale that my kids loved when they were little.  It’s not about St. Patrick’s Day, but it does have a leprechaun in it 😊

Jamie O'Rourke

Title: Jamie O’Rourke And The Big Potato: An Irish Folktale

Written & Illustrated By: Tomie de Paola

A Paper Star Book, The Putnam & Grosset Group, 1997, fiction

Suitable For Ages: 4-8

Themes/Topics: folktale (Irish), laziness, luck, making assumptions, humor

Opening: “Jamie O’Rourke was the laziest man in all of Ireland.
He would do anything to avoid working, especially if it had to do with growing potatoes.”

Screen Shot 2020-03-12 at 7.52.21 PM

text and illustration copyright Tomie dePaola 1997 Putnam&Grosset Group

Brief Synopsis: Jamie O’Rourke is so lazy he makes his wife do all the work.  When she hurts her back, he figures they’ll starve so he goes to confess his sins.  On his way to church he comes upon a leprechaun who offers a solution – a seed to grow the biggest potato in the world.  The leprechaun thinks he’s tricked Jamie, but in the end, it is Jamie who wins!

Links To Resources: Leprechaun Crafts; Leprechaun Coloring Pages; Easy Shamrock Pretzel Pops (recipe)

Why I Like This Book: I love the folktale language and rhythm of this story.  Jamie is delightful in his laziness.  When his wife hurts her back, he assumes they will starve (because he’s not going to work!) so he goes to confess his sins to Father O’Malley.  In an Irish twist on Jack and the Beanstalk, Jamie comes upon a leprechaun and accepts a seed that will grow the biggest potato in the world instead of the leprechaun’s pot of gold.  The potato grows so big it takes the whole village to dig it up, and then, as things tend to happen in folk tales 😊 it rolls down the hill and blocks the only way into or out of town.  The end result? The whole village gets enough potato to last them through the winter but when spring comes they are SO TIRED of eating potato that they bargain with Jamie: if he promises not to plant another giant potato, they will gladly make sure he and his wife always have enough to eat.  So lazy Jamie wins the day!  This ending – a reversal of expectation (you’d assume that Jamie would learn to do an honest day’s work) gives a great opportunity to talk about making assumptions, what a more deserving solution might have been, and surprise endings.  A fun story all around. 😊

I hope you enjoy it as much as I do 🙂

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illustration copyright Tomie dePaola 1997 Putnam&Grosset Group

For the complete list of books with resources, please visit Perfect Picture Books.

PPBF folks, please add your titles and post-specific links (and any other info you feel like filling out 🙂 ) to the form below so we can all come see what fabulous picture books you’ve chosen to share this week!


Have a wonderful weekend, everyone!!! 😊☘️

Would You Read It Wednesday #352 – What Would Mozart Do? (PB)

Hi there, my friends!

It’s Would You Read It Wednesday, once again!  Hooray!

Before we get to today’s pitch I want to spread some cheer.  The world seems to be a bit of an alarming place at the moment, and I think we can all use a little dose of cuteness and sunshine and happiness 😊

Untitled design (3)

And for anyone who is a writer, there might be a little story inspiration in puppies and easter eggs, springtime flowers and splashing in puddles 😊 It’s possible three little kittens has been done… but there’s always room for a new twist! 😊

Let’s follow with Something Chocolate – always a way to brighten the day!  I thought with St. Patrick’s Day right around the corner it might be fun to add a little good luck into our chocolate 😊

Shamrock Pretzel Pops

 

So festive and delicious!  For even more chocolate-y goodness, you can dip the pretzels in white chocolate mixed with a drop of green coloring and let them set before adding the other ingredients!

Now that we are all feeling cheered, let’s have a look at today’s pitch which comes to us from Paulette.  Paulette is a writer and pianist who dreaded every one of her childhood piano recitals. Her debut picture book, A Doll for Grandma: A Story About Alzheimer’s Disease (Beaming Books, 2020), was inspired by her work as a volunteer pianist in memory-care homes.

Find her on the web at:

Website: https://paulettesharkey.com/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/pbsharkey

Here is her pitch:

Working Title: What Would Mozart Do?

Age/Genre: Picture Book (ages 5-9)

The Pitch:  When a ringing cell phone derails Parker during his piano recital, he uses a tip from Mozart, a sparrow’s warble, and a bit of outside-the-box thinking to save his performance. A story about learning that things can be okay even when they don’t go as planned.

So what do you think?  Would You Read It?  YES, MAYBE or NO?

If your answer is YES, please feel free to tell us what you particularly liked and why the pitch piqued your interest.  If your answer is MAYBE or NO, please feel free to tell us what you think could be better in the spirit of helping Paulette improve her pitch.  Helpful examples of possible alternate wordings are welcome.  (However I must ask that comments be constructive and respectful.  I reserve the right not to publish comments that are mean because that is not what this is about.)

Please send YOUR pitches for the coming weeks!  For rules and where to submit, click on this link Would You Read It or on Would You Read it in the dropdown under For Writers in the bar above.  There are openings in April, so you could get your pitch up pretty soon for helpful feedback and a chance to have it read and commented on by editor Erin Molta!

Paulette is looking forward to your thoughts on her pitch!  I am looking forward to Spring! 🌷🌷🌷

Have a wonderful Wednesday everyone!!! 😊

 

Tuesday Debut – Presenting Janet Johnson!

Hi Everybody!

Tuesday Debut is always a fun and exciting day, but it’s especially fun and exciting when the debut-ess is a hackey-sack queen and a personalized license plate fan 🙂

I am thrilled to introduce you to Janet Johnson and her debut picture book!

Help Wanted, Must Love Books
Written by: Janet Sumner Johnson
Illustrated by: Courtney Dawson
Published by: Capstone
Fiction, ages 4-7
March 1, 2020

Cover.Help Wanted Must Love Books.small

When Shailey’s dad starts a new job, and it gets in the way of their bedtime story routine, Shailey takes action! She fires her dad, posts a Help Wanted sign, and starts interviews immediately.

SUSANNA: Welcome, Janet!  Thank you so much for joining us today!  We are so excited to have you!!!  Where did the idea for this book come from?

JANET: This story idea came from my husband and daughter’s own bedtime story routine. One night, my then-7-year-old came in and announced it was time for bedtime stories. My husband had a work presentation the next morning and lots to prepare, so he told her he couldn’t. My daughter didn’t beg. She stomped her foot and said, “I’ll read my own story!”

I laughed, and said, “I think you just got fired!” And boom! The idea struck. It wasn’t fully formed, but over the next hour, I asked myself a bunch of questions: If she fires her dad, what will she do next? And if she puts up a help wanted sign, who can actually apply for the job? Siblings? Mom? Neighbors? I didn’t like those ideas, so I kept digging until I stumbled on the idea of book characters. That led to brainstorming a list of possible candidates, and what problems they would each bring to the story.

 

SUSANNA: How long did it take you to write this book?

JANET: My first draft went fast. I had it done in about an hour. That is unusual for me. What really helped was that I had a great model for who my character was (through my daughter). I knew what my character’s problem was. I knew what she would do to try to fix the problem. And I knew how I wanted it to end. By answering those questions before I began writing, the actual writing went very quickly.

Revision took much longer.

 

SUSANNA: Did you go through many revisions?

JANET: Haha! Yep. Lots of revision. First, I had several rounds with my critique partners. They pointed out some problems I hadn’t thought of. For example, while Shailey put up the help wanted sign, she didn’t really do anything else in that first version, so I needed to make her more pro-active.

It was hard to hear, because I loved what I’d written, but I turned off that urge to argue, and instead worked on finding a solution. That took some more brainstorming. I had to re-organize my characters, and find some new ones that would work with the new structure. And amazing, I liked that new version even better!

My agent also asked for several revisions. She pointed out some characters who might be too obscure for kids. She also pointed out inconsistencies with who I’d chosen. For example, in that earlier draft, one candidate was the monster in her closet, who, she rightly pointed out, was not a book character. That meant more brainstorming to find more characters.

The key to good revision is listening. Readers could see things I couldn’t because I was too close to the story.

 

SUSANNA: When did you know your manuscript was ready for submission?

JANET: When my agent had no more comments on my draft! I’m a huge proponent of agents, and critique partners. If it had just been me, I would have sent that first draft because I loved it so much. If that had happened, it would not be a book now.

 

 

SUSANNA: When and how did you submit?

JANET: I have an agent, so when the manuscript was ready, my agent sent me a list of publishers she was sending it to. She forwarded responses as she got them, and my main job was to sit back, forget all about it (haha!), and write the next thing.

 

SUSANNA: When did you get “the call”?  (Best moment ever! 🙂 )

JANET: The whole submission process was quite the ride. We went out in January, and in February, I got an R&R. The editor really liked it, but felt the ending was too obvious. I talked with my agent about it, and we decided to go for it, because we had ideas. This isn’t typical, but my agent decided to send the change to every editor who had it.

Once we did that, I had a lot of interest. My book went to several acquisitions meetings (some with the old ending, and some with the new), and I had a lot of close calls, but in the end, none of them offered. That was really hard.

By July, my agent and I had moved on to submitting the next book. So, when she called, I had zero expectations. I was in the kitchen, texting with some author friends, glumly reporting that I had nothing to report. And then everything changed with those four magic words: “We have an offer!”

And because I’m guessing some of you are curious, my editor allowed me to choose my preferred ending. I went with the original which she confessed was her favorite, too. Writing really is so subjective!

 

SUSANNA: Those words, “We have an offer!” really are magical, aren’t they?  There is nothing like them (except for maybe it’s a girl! or it’s a boy! 🙂 ) How did you celebrate signing your contract?

JANET: I went out to dinner with my family. (After an impromptu dance party in the kitchen!)

 

SUSANNA: Was the contract what you expected in terms of advance, royalty percentage, publication timeline, author copies etc.?

JANET: Because I had already published a middle grade book with my publisher (Capstone), my expectations were pretty grounded. However, the advance was significantly lower than I expected (under 5K) because they had recently gone through a re-organization.

We sold World Rights and negotiated royalties to 6% for hard cover and paperback, 12% for digital products, and 5% for audio. They were willing to negotiate on percentages, but not on the advance, which I found interesting. I will receive 20 copies as the author, and my agent will receive some as well.

Some other interesting contract things: we negotiated the non-compete clause to make it more narrow. We negotiated how much say I would have on images and cover (spoiler alert, not much, but more than zero!). And the contract included deadlines for both the publisher and me. It was a pretty straight-forward contract.

 

 

SUSANNA: What was the editorial process like for you?

JANET: The editorial process really surprised me. I had an initial chat with my editor, who had almost no changes for me at the time. They wanted a new title, and we discussed adding back matter. I spent a month working on that.

Over the next several months, I got periodic emails with suggested changes—some big, some small. Often, they came because of feedback from another department (like marketing). This continued up until the day it was being sent to print (we literally made the last change that day!).

I considered all the comments thoughtfully, but there were times I still didn’t agree. When that happened, I would share my concerns with my editor, and explain why I disagreed. At that point we could talk it through and come to a solution we both felt good about—sometimes that meant we left it as it was, and sometimes that meant changing it.

I think communication is so important. There is so much give and take in the process—as an author you need to both listen and speak up for yourself. It can be a delicate balance. It helped to remember that we both loved the book and had the same goal of making the best story possible.

 

Captain Hook

 

SUSANNA: I have to say that the back matter in your book is one of my favorite parts – so entertaining! 🙂  Can you tell us a little about your experience of the illustration process?

JANET: As per my contract, I got to see the sketches and give input. However, in the case we disagreed, the publisher had the final say. Everything was sent digitally, so no F&Gs.

For the most part I loved what I saw. We were all definitely on the same page in terms of vision. However, I did have some concerns.

The publisher made a few changes based on my comments, but also chose not to make others. Some of that came down to cost, which I can respect. But it also meant that I had to change some of the text to work a little better with the images. I definitely hadn’t expected that! Still, I love how the book turned out.

My manuscript had quite a few art notes, and to my surprise, my editor made a point to thank me for having as many as I did. Here is one example of how my art note went from text to image:

This arrangement worked perfectly . . . until her dad got a new job.

[ART: Dad on cell phone; Dad studying a book; Dad tapping at laptop; Dad snoring on couch]

 

Janet's Favorite Spread

 

This is probably my favorite spread! I’m so happy with how it turned out.

 

 

SUSANNA: Did you get to see advance reviews from Kirkus, SLJ, etc?  What was that like?

JANET: The marketing department sends me all the advance reviews shortly before they publish. I’ve had some not-so-nice reviews in the past, so I have mixed feelings about this. I have to let those emails sit while I build up the courage to look.

When the reviewers like your book, it’s fabulous. And since they don’t review everything, it’s a really happy thing when they do. But the not-nice reviews are tough. I remind myself that not everyone will like my book, and that it’s not a critique of me personally.

 

 

SUSANNA: How long did it take from offer to having the first copy in your hand?

JANET: From offer to copy in hand (I’m estimating, because I don’t actually have one yet!) was about 20 months. For a picture book, that feels really fast. The publishing date changed a couple of times and ended up being faster than expected.

 

 

 

SUSANNA: What kind of marketing and promotion has your publisher done for this book?

JANET: My publisher offered advanced copies at ALA in 2019, and also put it on NetGalley. That’s made a huge impact on getting the word out about my book. They sent ARCs to bloggers and review groups, as well as to the industry reviewers like Booklist and Publisher’s Weekly. They regularly post about it on their social media accounts, and they also support my tweets. Recently they hosted a free webinar for teachers and librarians, and they book-talked all their upcoming titles, including mine.

One thing I’m really excited about is that they’re making a book trailer! It should be out soon.

 

 

SUSANNA: Ooh!  I can’t wait to see the book trailer!  Describe any marketing/promotion you did for this book.

JANET: Marketing and promotion is something I’m constantly learning. One of the best things I’ve done is join a debut group for picture books: the Debut Crew 2020. We work together to promote each other’s work and to find opportunities to build our platforms. It’s been super helpful!

In addition, I had bookmarks made, and still plan to make some stickers and other swag for future events. I also hope to get some coloring pages made, as well as an activity guidebook.

While I’m not doing an official blog tour, I’ve been fortunate to be invited to interview or write a guest post on several blogs in the weeks surrounding my book’s release.

I’ve also booked several in-person events over the next few months: a book launch, bookstore signings, school visits, book festivals, conference presentations, and NerdCampSoCal. You can see the full list on my events page. I’m excited to have so many opportunities to make connections and promote my book.

A lot of these opportunities have come because of connections I’ve made with people at previous events or through online discussions. Others have come from participating in groups on social media where others have shared calls for proposals or information about upcoming events. Making connections is key.

 

 

SUSANNA: How long was it between the time you started writing seriously and the time you sold your first picture book?

JANET: It took about 8 years to get that first picture book deal. Granted, I was focusing on middle grade for a lot of that time, but I’ve had the dream of getting a picture book published from the beginning. It’s still hard to believe I’m a published picture book author!

Thanks so much for having me, Susanna! Your classes made such a difference for me!

JanetJohnson.AuthorPic

Author Janet Johnson

Social Media Links:

Website: http://janetsumnerjohnson.com/
Twitter: @MsVerbose
Instagram: @janetsumnerjohnson
Facebook: @janetsumnerjohnson

 

SUSANNA:  Thank you so much for joining us today and sharing your experience, Janet!  It was so interesting and enlightening – a real benefit for our readers!  I know I speak for all of us when I wish you all the best with this and future books!

Readers, if you have questions for Janet, please post them in the comments below and if she has time I’m sure she’ll respond!

You may purchase Janet’s book at:
(all links below are book-specific)

Indiebound
Amazon
Barnes&Noble

We can help our debut authors successfully launch their careers by:

– purchasing their books

– recommending their books to friends and family

– recommending their books to our children’s teachers and librarians

– recommending their books to our local libraries and bookstores

– suggesting them as visiting authors at our children’s schools and our local libraries

– sharing their books on social media

– reviewing their books on Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes&Noble, and other sites where people go to learn about books.

Thank you all for stopping by to read today!  Have a lovely, inspiration-filled Tuesday!  Maybe today is the day you’ll write your debut picture book 🙂

 

Missed any previous Tuesday Debuts?  Check them out!

Christy Mihaly – Hey! Hey! Hay! A Tale of Bales And The Machines That Make Them

Jessie Oliveros – The Remember Balloons

Beth Anderson – An Inconvenient Alphabet: Ben Franklin And Noah Webster’s Spelling Revolution

Hannah Holt – The Diamond And The Boy

Laura Renauld – Porcupine’s Pie

Annie Romano – Before You Sleep: A Bedtime Book Of Gratitude

Melissa Stoller – Scarlet’s Magic Paintbrush

Sherry Howard – Rock And Roll Woods

Kate Narita – 100 Bugs! A Counting Book

Vivian Kirkfield – Pippa’s Passover Plate

Laura Roettiger – Aliana Reaches For The Moon

Matthew Lasley – Pedro’s Pan: A Gold Rush Story

Natalee Creech – When Day Is Done

Margaret Chiu Greanias – Maximillian Villainous

Wendy Greenley – Lola Shapes The Sky

Danielle Dufayet – You Are Your Strong

B.J. Lee – There Was An Old Gator Who Swallowed A Moth

Cathy Ballou Mealey – When A Tree Grows

Pippa Chorley – Counting Sheep

Sandra Sutter – The Real Farmer In The Dell

June Smalls – Odd Animals ABC

Jill Mangel Weisfeld – Riley The Retriever Wants A New Job (self pub)

Kathleen Cornell Berman – The Birth Of Cool: How Jazz Great Miles Davis Found His Sound

Eleanor Ann Peterson – Jurassic Rat

Sarah Hoppe – Who Will? Will You?

Marla LeSage – Pirate Year Round

Stacey Corrigan – The Pencil Eater

Shannon Stocker – Can U Save The Day?

Nadine Poper – Randall And Randall

Christine Evans – Evelyn The Adventurous Entomologist

Karen Kiefer – Drawing God (religious market)

Susan Richmond – Bird Count

Dawn Young – The Night Baafore Christmas

Heather Gale – Ho’onani: Hula Warrior

Ciara O’Neal – Flamingo Hugs Aren’t For Everyone (self pub)

Theresa Kiser – A Little Catholic’s Book Of Liturgical Colors (religious market)

Lindsey Hobson – Blossom’s Wish (self pub)

Kirsten Larson – Wood, Wire, Wings: Emma Lilian Todd Invents An Airplane

Valerie Bolling – Let’s Dance!